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History of NCC Song

History of NCC Song

The desirability of composing a NCC song was considered in the Circle Commanders (now called DDGs) Conference held in January 1956 and all circles were asked to send their proposals. The official song of the NCC - "Kadam Mila Ke Chal" was adopted in 1963, and registered in 1969 with the approval of the Ministry of Defence. In 1974, it was felt that the NCC song had failed to catch the imagination of the youth, and there was a need for a change. A sustained process began; entries were invited from Directorates for suitable lyrics; 107 entries were received; of which eight were selected by a Board of Officers. However, all the eight were considered sub standard by Dr Nagendra of Delhi University, who was the judge. On the suggestion of Dr Nagendra, the task was entrusted to Shri Chiranjit, the Chief Producer, Drama Division, AIR, Delhi.


The song written by Shri Chiranjit was approved, in 1976. The Maharashtra Directorate was asked to get the song composed and recorded with the help of Shri Raj Kapoor, and the Films Division, Bombay. However, nothing much came out of this exercise as Shri Raj Kapoor was then busy in making his film "Satyam Shivam Sundaram" and the studios of the Films Division were under renovation. Later, Shri Mahinder Singh Bedi, a well known poet of Delhi, was requested to write another song. This effort also proved infructuous. AEC Centre Pachmarhi was also approached, but somehow the matter could not be finalized.


Almost during the same period and independent of efforts at Directorate General NCC, the Film Division undertook production of a documentary on NCC 'A Cadet’ s Diary’. The Director of the documentary was looking for a suitable song for the film. He happened to hear the song - 'Ham Sab Hindi Hain' which appears to have been first sung at a Youth Festival at Chandigarh, sometime during 1968-69, and introduced it in the documentary film.


The song was a hit and successive Director Generals (DGs) found it good and played it repeatedly in Republic Day camps. In 1980, the word 'Hindi' was substituted with 'Bhartiya'.
 





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